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Did my annual pilgrimage to Thich Nhat Hanh’s temple today. <3 #hue #vietnam #thichnhathanh #buddhism #travel #temple  (at Chùa Từ Hiếu)

Did my annual pilgrimage to Thich Nhat Hanh’s temple today. <3 #hue #vietnam #thichnhathanh #buddhism #travel #temple (at Chùa Từ Hiếu)

&#8220;Each attachment makes it harder to let go, to accept the nature of change.  But what would life be like if change never took place?  How would that girl or boy grow up to be a productive, energetic young adult?  Without social change, many of us would be mired in feudalism and slavery.  If the autumn leaves didn&#8217;t fall, there would be no space for spring’s buds to take hold.  Lightning strikes and causes the forest fire, which supports the natural replenishment of ecosystems.  Even our own brain undergoes a process of pruning neural pathways at different stages in our life span to make space for the richness of existing and emerging circuits.  Awareness and acceptance of impermanence can liberate the spirit and help us to appreciate the preciousness of life.  The more we can create a spaciousness and an acceptance of the temporary nature of all things, the less important our preferences become as well.&#8221; -Donald Altman

“Each attachment makes it harder to let go, to accept the nature of change.  But what would life be like if change never took place?  How would that girl or boy grow up to be a productive, energetic young adult?  Without social change, many of us would be mired in feudalism and slavery.  If the autumn leaves didn’t fall, there would be no space for spring’s buds to take hold.  Lightning strikes and causes the forest fire, which supports the natural replenishment of ecosystems.  Even our own brain undergoes a process of pruning neural pathways at different stages in our life span to make space for the richness of existing and emerging circuits.  Awareness and acceptance of impermanence can liberate the spirit and help us to appreciate the preciousness of life.  The more we can create a spaciousness and an acceptance of the temporary nature of all things, the less important our preferences become as well.” -Donald Altman

The Buddha said, “Of all the footprints, that of the elephant is supreme. Similarly, of all mindfulness meditation, that on death is supreme.” Death awareness meditations allow us to more deeply comprehend that we will die.&#8221;

The Buddha said, “Of all the footprints, that of the elephant is supreme. Similarly, of all mindfulness meditation, that on death is supreme.” Death awareness meditations allow us to more deeply comprehend that we will die.”

"Of course we all know that we will someday die. We know that every living thing will someday die. At the moment of birth our death is guaranteed. This is one of the most obvious facts of our existence. Yet in a way we do not really know it. Our aversion to the fact of our death causes us to deny, ignore, pretend, push away, and constantly distract ourselves. These habits create more fear and aversion, which become obstacles to the deeply satisfying intimacy and connection we seek with ourselves and other people. Aversion to death hinders our ability to live fully. Fear and aversion to death also leave us unprepared to die, and make it difficult to meet our death with peace and confidence."

"Of course we all know that we will someday die. We know that every living thing will someday die. At the moment of birth our death is guaranteed. This is one of the most obvious facts of our existence. Yet in a way we do not really know it. Our aversion to the fact of our death causes us to deny, ignore, pretend, push away, and constantly distract ourselves. These habits create more fear and aversion, which become obstacles to the deeply satisfying intimacy and connection we seek with ourselves and other people. Aversion to death hinders our ability to live fully. Fear and aversion to death also leave us unprepared to die, and make it difficult to meet our death with peace and confidence."

"The Buddha taught that awareness of our death helps us live a happier and more meaningful life, and enables us to prepare for a conscious and peaceful dying experience. In our culture, purposefully contemplating one’s death, or gathering with others to share our thoughts and feelings about death, are certainly not commonplace. Although it is changing somewhat, the medical establishment has long considered death a failure, a defeat, a humiliation or an embarrassment, not only for the dying person, but also for the dying person’s family members and professional caregivers. Many people conceive of their own death as the ultimate personal disaster. And whether we view death as an annihilation and obliteration, or are comforted by the possibility of an afterlife or rebirth, most people tend to think of death as something that is waiting for us at the end of a very long road which we call our life. In the Buddhist tradition, death is not waiting for us at the end of a long road. Rather, it is with us every moment. It is at our side, or just over our shoulder, a constant companion every step of the way. Death is also seen as liberation. It is described as the crossing of a threshold, a passage to freedom, sometimes likened to the removal of a tight shoe."

"The Buddha taught that awareness of our death helps us live a happier and more meaningful life, and enables us to prepare for a conscious and peaceful dying experience. In our culture, purposefully contemplating one’s death, or gathering with others to share our thoughts and feelings about death, are certainly not commonplace. Although it is changing somewhat, the medical establishment has long considered death a failure, a defeat, a humiliation or an embarrassment, not only for the dying person, but also for the dying person’s family members and professional caregivers. Many people conceive of their own death as the ultimate personal disaster. And whether we view death as an annihilation and obliteration, or are comforted by the possibility of an afterlife or rebirth, most people tend to think of death as something that is waiting for us at the end of a very long road which we call our life. In the Buddhist tradition, death is not waiting for us at the end of a long road. Rather, it is with us every moment. It is at our side, or just over our shoulder, a constant companion every step of the way. Death is also seen as liberation. It is described as the crossing of a threshold, a passage to freedom, sometimes likened to the removal of a tight shoe."

"When we seek happiness through accumulation, either outside of ourselves&#8212;from other people, relationships, or material goods&#8212;or from our own self-development, we are missing the essential point. In either case we are trying to find completion. But according to Buddhism, such a strategy is doomed. Completion comes not from adding another piece to ourselves but from surrendering our ideas of perfection." -Mark Epstein

"When we seek happiness through accumulation, either outside of ourselves—from other people, relationships, or material goods—or from our own self-development, we are missing the essential point. In either case we are trying to find completion. But according to Buddhism, such a strategy is doomed. Completion comes not from adding another piece to ourselves but from surrendering our ideas of perfection." -Mark Epstein

Tagged with:  #Mark Epstein  #Buddhism  #Happiness

Hue is known for being the most culturally Buddhist city in Vietnam, which means it has (in my opinion) some of the best vegetarian food in the world.

Of all the vegetarian restaurants in Hue, Lien Hoa (3 Lê Qúy Dôn Street) is definitely the most popular and well-known among tourists, expats, and even locals.  It’s a good place to bring big groups, since many of the dishes are served family-style, and you’re guaranteed to never break the bank when you split the bill (around 20,000-50,000 vnd a person.)  Personally though, I like the cheaper, more local, vegetarian options when I’m eating solo or with a few friends.  I’ll introduce you to those places soon enough.